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Last week, when Google gobbled up Fitbit in a $2.1 billion acquisition, the talk was mostly about what the company would do with all that wrist-jingling and power-walking data. It’s no secret that Google’s parent Alphabet—along with fellow giants Apple and Facebook—is on an aggressive hunt for health data. But it turns out there’s a cheaper way to get access to it: Teaming up with healthcare providers.

On Monday, https://www.wsj.com/articles/google-s-secret-project-nightingale-gathers-personal-health-data-on-millions-of-americans-11573496790"}" href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/google-s-secret-project-nightingale-gathers-personal-health-data-on-millions-of-americans-11573496790" rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">the Wall Street Journal reported details on Project Nightingale, Google’s under-the-radar partnership with Ascension, the nation’s second-largest health system. The project, which reportedly began last year, includes sharing the personal health data of tens of millions of unsuspecting patients. The bulk of the work is being done under Google’s Cloud division, which has been developing AI-based services for medical providers.

Source: Wired

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Telephone directory service has gone through a massive upheaval over the past year. Jingle Networks was able to take about 6% of the market and a patent with their Free 411 service. However, what started with Jingle Networks has exploded to a wider field of competition including heavyweights like Google and AT&T. But now, rather unceremoniously, Microsoft has finally gotten into the mix by launching their own free directory service, Live Search 411, this week. The announcement was mixed in with a few other notes about visual enhancements across their maps services. In contrast, Google has been visibly promoting their effort.

Source: TechCrunch via Yahoo

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How the Copyright Directive reshapes the open web

It’s strange to think about now, but until the 1920s, you didn’t generally need a passport to travel. A smart CEO I know recently mentioned this to me in the context of what’s happening to the internet. The idea of making citizens carry documents to promote border security, he said, dates only to the aftermath of World War I.

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As of today, though, the web no longer feels truly worldwide. Instead, we now have the American internet, the authoritarian internet, and the European internet. How does the EU Copyright Directive change our understanding of the web? James Vincent describes its changes, which still must be implemented by individual countries, in The Verge:

Source: THE VERGE

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Tens of thousands of Optus customers have had their mobile phone numbers and addresses mistakenly published online.

Optus has told nearly 50,000 customers that their name, address, mobile and home phone numbers were wrongly published in the White Pages, run by Sensis, against the customers' wishes.

The data breach was discovered by Optus during a routine audit of 10 million customers.

Source:The Age (AU)

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As soon as Facebook launched its Graph Search in 2013, it was only a matter of time before it became a big player in the search engine game.

But Graph Search was limited as far as optimization was concerned. The results it returned focused on providing an answer on the relationships between people, places, and things on Facebook rather than a link that contained what was likely the answer to your query like Google.

It was an IFTTT statement on steroids that never missed a workout.

It wasn’t until 2015 that Facebook became a major player in keyword search.

Source:Search Engine Watch

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