Latest News

France's data watchdog announced Monday a fine of 50 million euros ($57 million) for US web search giant Google, using the EU's strict General Data Protection Regulation for the first time.

Source: The Local FR

Read Original Article

Privacy International (PI) has filed complaints of "systematic infringements" of data protection law by seven info-sucking companies that it says find it too easy to fly under the radar.

In the civil rights group's sight are data brokers Acxiom and Oracle, ad-tech firms Critero, Quantcast and Tapad, and credit referencing agencies Equifax and Experian.

PI said it wants European data protection watchdogs to launch probes into the seven companies, which it claimed exploit the data of millions of people without thorough criticism, to assess whether their practices meet the standards set in the General Data Protection Regulation.

Source: The Register

Read Original Article:

Google today announced a new version of Google Maps that will launch later this summer. All of the core Google Maps features for getting directions aren’t going away, of course, but on top of that, the team has now built a new set of features that are all about exploration.

Source TechCrunch

Read Original Article

In 2015, Microsoft’s Bing search engine achieved something it had never had before: relevancy. By notching a 20-percent share of U.S. search, according to comScore, it managed to impact Google, the brand that was literally synonymous with search. 

In 2018, it seems like Bing’s willing to hand some of that success right back. Why? Because, as a habitual Bing user, I’ve noticed a deterioration in quality.

Source: PCWorld

Read Original Article

Six North Koreans were executed by firing squad after trying to smuggle out the nation's phonebook, it has emerged. 

The residents from the capital Pyongyang were executed at the end of last year on the charge of treason for attempting to leak the contents of a directory to the outside world.

Their relatives were booted out of the city and exiled in the countryside. North Korea's phonebook is considered a secret document.

Source: Daily Mail

Read Original Article

Unparalleled

Service & Support