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How the Copyright Directive reshapes the open web

It’s strange to think about now, but until the 1920s, you didn’t generally need a passport to travel. A smart CEO I know recently mentioned this to me in the context of what’s happening to the internet. The idea of making citizens carry documents to promote border security, he said, dates only to the aftermath of World War I.

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As of today, though, the web no longer feels truly worldwide. Instead, we now have the American internet, the authoritarian internet, and the European internet. How does the EU Copyright Directive change our understanding of the web? James Vincent describes its changes, which still must be implemented by individual countries, in The Verge:

Source: THE VERGE

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As soon as Facebook launched its Graph Search in 2013, it was only a matter of time before it became a big player in the search engine game.

But Graph Search was limited as far as optimization was concerned. The results it returned focused on providing an answer on the relationships between people, places, and things on Facebook rather than a link that contained what was likely the answer to your query like Google.

It was an IFTTT statement on steroids that never missed a workout.

It wasn’t until 2015 that Facebook became a major player in keyword search.

Source:Search Engine Watch

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More than 95,000 complaints have been filed with EU countries since the bloc's flagship data protection laws took effect eight months ago, the executive European Commission said Friday.

The complaints have already triggered three financial penalties, including France's record 50 million euros fine Monday on US giant Google for not doing enough inform users on how their data is used.

Source: Phys Org

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Male impotence, substance abuse, right-wing politics, left-wing politics, sexually transmitted diseases, cancer, mental health.

Those are just a few of the advertising labels that Google’s adtech infrastructure routinely sticks to Internet users as it watches and tracks what they do online in order to target them with behavioral ads.

Intimate and highly sensitive inferences such as these are then systematically broadcast and shared with what can be thousands of third party companies, via the real-time ad auction broadcast process which powers the modern programmatic online advertising system. So essentially you’re looking at the rear-end reality of how creepy ads work.

This practice is already the target of a legal complaint in Europe, filed under the bloc’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Source: TechCrunch

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France's data watchdog announced Monday a fine of 50 million euros ($57 million) for US web search giant Google, using the EU's strict General Data Protection Regulation for the first time.

Source: The Local FR

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